News

Now you can drink like J.R. from ‘Dallas’

Now you can drink like J.R. from ‘Dallas’

DRINK LIKE 'DALLAS:' This 1981 file photo provided by CBS shows Larry Hagman in character as J.R. Ewing in the television series "Dallas." Actor Larry Hagman, who for more than a decade played villainous patriarch JR Ewing in the TV soap Dallas, died in 2012. Photo: Associated Press

Bosses of TV drama “Dallas” are paying tribute to the late Larry Hagman with a new brand of liquor named after his iconic character J.R. Ewing.

The veteran actor passed away in November, 2012 after a battle with cancer, and to honor Hagman and his lasting legacy, show executives have teamed up with three Dallas, Texas-based bottling companies to create J.R. Ewing Bourbon, the character’s drink of choice.

The four-year-old, 80 percent proof liquor is distilled in Kentucky and the glass container features a screen-printed image of the Ewings’ iconic home of Southfork Ranch.

J.R. Ewing Bourbon will initially be released in 14 states in the U.S., to coincide with the third-season premiere of Dallas on Feb. 24, before a planned international sale by the end of the year.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment, Sports

Was ‘Concussion’ altered to avoid angering the NFL?

Fresh
10-overlay1

Hacked Sony emails appear to show that the m arketing plans for the movie were positioned to focus on the story of a whistle-blower, rather than a condemnation of the sport.

in National

Millions hit by data hack still don’t know they’re victims

Fresh
11-overlay

The U.S. government has not yet notified any of the 21.5 million federal employees and contractors whose security clearance data was hacked more than three months ago.

in National

Study: Millennials’ credit scores are in the gutter

Updated
creditcard

Millennials get plenty of recognition for frugality and their desire to share everything from cars to clothes, but they also have the lowest average credit score of any generation.

in Sports

Deflategate decision expected by Friday

tombrady

Judge Richard Berman will soon issue his ruling on whether New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady must serve a four-game suspension.

in National

Nearly a quarter of Americans call their jobs ‘meaningless’

25-overlay2

A new poll shows 24 percent of Americans say their jobs do not make a meaningful contribution to the world.