UConn celebrates again as women’s team wins title

UConn celebrates again as women’s team wins title

NATIONAL CHAMPIONS, TWO TIMES OVER:Connecticut center Stefanie Dolson holds the net after the second half of the championship game against Notre Dame in the Final Four of the NCAA women's college basketball tournament, Tuesday, April 8, in Nashville, Tenn. Connecticut won 79-58. Photo: Associated Press/John Bazemore

PAT EATON-ROBB, Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — UConn police say fans for the most part behaved themselves following the Huskies 79-58 win over Notre Dame for the NCAA women’s basketball championship.

Only two arrests had been reported before midnight Tuesday, one for breach of peace and the other for reckless endangerment.

Police Chief Barbara O’Connor issued a statement thanking the thousands of fans on campus for making it a positive celebration.

About 7,500 fans came to Gampel Pavilion for a rally to welcome home Husky men after their win over Kentucky on Monday.

Several thousand, including several members of the men’s team, stayed in the arena and watched on large movie screens as the women blew out Notre Dame.

It’s the second dual championship for UConn, which also won the men’s and women’s titles in 2004.

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