News

Asiana scraps plan to sue TV station for name gaffe

Asiana scraps plan to sue TV station for name gaffe

A passenger walks past a logo of Asiana Airline at the Incheon Airport in Incheon, west of Seoul July 7, 2013. Photo: Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

SEOUL (Reuters) – Asiana Airlines said on Wednesday it has scrapped a plan to sue a U.S. television station that incorrectly reported in a racially offensive manner the names of pilots of the flight that crash-landed in San Francisco this month.

“Asiana Airlines has decided not to proceed with the case since KTVU has issued a formal apology and in order for us to focus all our efforts on managing the aftermath of the accident,” the South Korean company said in a statement.

An anchorwoman at KTVU, a Fox affiliate based in Oakland, California, fell victim last week to an apparent prank and reported four bogus pilot names, including “Sum Ting Wong” and “Wi Tu Low,” during a newscast.

The airline had said this week that it would sue the television station because the reporting defamed the pilots and the company.

The crash of the Boeing 777 plane resulted in the death of three Chinese teenage girls who were visiting the United States for a summer camp. More than 180 passengers and crew members were injured.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment

Today in entertainment history: Nov. 21

dallas

A look back on the Hollywood headlines that went down in history.

in Sports

Buffalo Bills: $10/hour plus tickets to help us dig out

bills

The stadium is buried under 220,000 tons of snow and the team is scrambling to shovel it all in time for Sunday's game.

in Sports

NBA trailblazer Collins: Remember me as ‘good teammate’

jasoncollins

Jason Collins says he wants to be remembered as a good teammate than as the first openly gay player in major American sports.

in Black Friday, Lifestyle, National

Does your state have a ‘miserable’ Thanksgiving?

fight

If you live in Ohio, Iowa, or Maine, your Thanksgiving might be more 'fight' than 'festive.'

in National

Obama seeks to build Congress support for immigration reform

immigration

The changes could allow as many as 5 million undocumented people to come out of the shadows and into American society.